Exciting News! Introducing our New Class: Strong and Supported 

  • Do you suffer from arthritic knees or hips?
  • Did you know that exercise therapy can reduce your knee pain and help minimise the need for surgery?

We have created a new Physiotherapy class using the latest research in osteoarthritis.

The class will run twice a week for 6 weeks to help patients manage their arthritic symptoms through education and exercise, in a safe, small group environment.

When? Flexible times are available – Please reply to this email or ring the practice to request a time!

Where? Maroubra Road Physiotherapy, 16 Maroubra Road.

Cost? As a special opening offer for the month of November 2019 you can try your first class for $10 to see if this class is for you 🙂 All other Classes: $25 per session (check your health fund for cover)

Be quick as we expect the classes to fill up fast. This offer is limited to availability

Who? Anyone is welcome, but spots are limited!! Contact us now at (02) 9314 3888 to reserve your spot

Childhood growing pains: What are they and how to fix them

We probably don’t need to tell you that family life in Sydney can be flat out with your child’s sporting activities throughout the entire year.  You may find that your child is complaining about muscular pain in their legs and knees. 

Recent research shows that nearly 15% of school age children have occasional limb pain, also known as growing pains. A large Australian study by Evans and Scutter found that 37% of children aged four to six years old experience growing pains. 

Unravelling the mystery of growing pains 

Growing pains are often underdiagnosed and misunderstood  by GPs. They are treated as an enigmatic condition, however evidence-based research shows that growing pains do exist. As this is a musculoskeletal condition, the treatment modalities for managing growing pains are relatively simple. In this article, the team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will outline how parents can recognise this condition in their child and also common treatment modalities. 

What are growing pains? 

Growing pains are muscular pains that are common in children during periods of rapid growth. They are caused when a child’s bones grow faster than the length of their muscles. This leads to an increase in muscle tension and pain which can be moderate to severe. Growing pains are common in children aged between three to eight years old, as well as in adolescents. Although not considered extremely serious, growing pains can disrupt your child’s sleeping patterns and can negatively affect their overall physical and emotional wellbeing.

What causes growing pains? 

Growing pains occur as a result of rapid periods of musculoskeletal growth. There are also other factors that can impact the likelihood of your child experiencing growing pains. 

 

  • High impact sports: Sports that involve running and jumping can aggravate growing pains. Non-weight bearing sports like swimming and cycling are less likely to cause pain. 
  • Running gait: How your child runs can influence the likelihood they will experience pain. 
  • Foot position and pronation: How your child foot pronates or rolls can aggravate growing pains.  
  • Previous strains and sprains: A history of previous strains and sprains that were poorly managed. 
  • Inadequate footwear: Unsuitable footwear may contribute to problems with how your child runs and moves, leading to pain. 
  • A low pain threshold: Research shows that a child with a lower tolerance to pain is more likely to experience growing pains during key growth periods of their childhood and adolescence.  

 

 

The symptoms of growing pains 

  • Your child reports mild to severe pain in the legs, knees, shins and heels that may keep them awake at night. 
  • This may occur in both legs or be worse in one leg. 
  • The pain may be worse during or after a period of intense physical activity or high impact sport
  • Your child reports pain that is worse in the evening and at night, but often improves by the morning, after bed rest. 

How Maroubra Road Physiotherapy can help your child 

Physiotherapy is highly effective at treating growing pains and hastening recovery time. At Maroubra Road Physiotherapy, we provide an individualised and caring approach to our treatments for children, including hands-on treatment, exercise prescriptions, at home exercise programs, stretching and much more. 

The team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will ask you questions about your child’s health, their pain, activity levels and the sports they participate in. The physiotherapist will do a physical assessment that may include an assessment of range of motion, palpation of the muscles, bones and tendons, along with a series of physical tests of muscle and ligament strength. 

Then the physiotherapist will assess the way your child moves, their gait and how they run and jump. In complex cases, the physiotherapist may suggest further investigations and refer them to a doctor for blood tests or scans in order to rule out other conditions. From this information, the physiotherapist will make a diagnosis.

Treatment modalities: growing pains

Once the physiotherapist has established a diagnosis of growing pains, then a number of treatments may be suggested. 

Strengthening and balancing exercises

Strengthening core and global muscle groups is essential. The team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy can design a strengthening program that will be tailored to the specific needs of your child. 

Home-based exercise programs

A home-based exercise program may include proprioception (balance) exercises as well as customised drills that are related to the sports you child plays. 

Strapping tape

This may be useful for relieving pressure in painful areas of the leg and joints and to ease inflammation. 

Orthotic inserts and/or suitable footwear

Biomechanical issues with walking can be corrected by the use of customised orthotic inserts, or with shoes that are supportive and help with correcting walking issues. 

Muscle mobilisation and massage

The physiotherapist may use massage, stretching, muscle manipulation and heat in order to relax and lengthen tight muscles and to mobilise stiff joints. 

Rest time 

If your child is experiencing severe pain that won’t abate, the physiotherapist may recommend a period of complete rest from sport and any intensive physical activity. In these cases, other forms of gentle and low impact exercises may be recommended such as swimming or cycling, as well as a personalised treatment program. Children can normally resume physical activity again, the key is finding the right activity that won’t aggravate the pain.  

Personalised recommendations for your child 

In all cases, the physiotherapists at Maroubra Road Physio always respond to the needs of our patients with personalised recommendations on treatment modalities. 

A corrective program and ongoing management of growing pains should be prescribed early on in order to correct musculoskeletal problems in children. For treatment and help for your child, speak with our experienced and caring team today on 02 9314 3888.  

References 

Burns, Joshua (2018) Health Check: are growing pains real? Children’s Hospital at Westmead & University of Sydney, The Conversation. 

Evans AM, Scutter SD (2004) Prevalence of “Growing pains” in young children. J Pediatr. 2004, 145: 255-258. 10.1016/j.jpeds.2004.04.045.

Evans AM (2008) Growing pains: contemporary knowledge and recommended practice, Journal of Foot and Ankle Research.

Uziel, Yosef (2007) Growing Pains in Children, Journal of Pediatric Rheumatology. Yosef. 

How to avoid injury when training for the Sydney Marathon

Whether you’re a seasoned marathon runner or a first-timer, embarking on the Sydney marathon is an exciting, daunting and admirable adventure. In this blog post, you will learn about how to avoid common injuries from long-distance running as well as how to spot warning signs that something is wrong. 

Top tips for avoiding injury during marathon training 

  • Always warm up and cool down properly. You can follow our helpful hints on warm-ups and warm-downs in our previous blog post. 
  • You should start at a slower pace when running and gradually build up your running intensity and distance over time. 
  • Make sure you stay hydrated during your run. 
  • Avoid doing too much, too early in your training. You should attempt a graduated training program that includes periods of 24-48 hours of rest between running sessions. 
  • Mix-up your runs with other forms of exercise, such as strengthening and core-focused exercises (Pilates and Yoga), along with swimming and cross-training. 

Signs that something is not quite right 

Constant pain: If you’re experiencing constant and unrelenting pain, then it’s time to seek professional advice from a physiotherapist. 

Body stiffness: If you have ever woken up the day after a run and found yourself feeling as stiff as a board, this is a sign you’re not adequately warming up or warming down. This can be improved with proper warm-ups and warm-downs. 

Excessive fatigue: This may be a sign you don’t have enough recovery time between training sessions. An exercise physiologist, personal trainer or physiotherapist will be able to advise you on the optimum timings and intensity that is right for you. 

Do’s and Don’ts of Personal Safety

Noise cancellation headphones that block out all noise can be hazardous for personal safety. So if you do enjoy running with headphones on, stay extra alert on the roads.

If you run during the night time, you should stick to well-lit paths. It’s also a good idea to run with a friend and also to wear high-vis clothing, to make sure you are visible to cars, bikes and other people. 

When running during the heat of the summer, it’s a good idea to wear a hat and sunscreen to protect against sun damage.

Common marathon training injuries 

Whether you’re a novice or a seasoned runner, you may be familiar with the saying – Make Pain Your Friend. It’s the opposite in reality though, you don’t need to suffer to be a runner. 

Knee injuries 

Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome (PFPS): Pain right behind the kneecap is common for long-distance runners. It’s also known as patellofemoral pain syndrome or “runner’s knee”. As you take a leap forward and impact with the ground, you experience pain. 

Meniscus injuries: The menisci are two wedge-shaped cartilage pads that act as shock-absorbers for the knees. Strong quadricep muscles help absorb the forces around the knee when you strike the ground, thus decreasing the forces running places through the joint. Good core and gluteal muscle strength also help with lower limb control when running and thereby also assisting in reducing the forces through the joint.

You can help prevent meniscal injuries by wearing appropriate footwear, cross-training and strength training.  Also, adequate hydration and dietary considerations need to come into play. If you need advice, contact the friendly team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy.

Lateral hip pain 

When you feel a dull ache on the outside of your hip, either during a run or afterwards, there may be a couple of likely causes. 

Iliotibial band syndrome: This is the thick fascial band that runs down the outside of the thigh. If you’re wearing old worn shoes, running on a slope,  or have weak buttock muscles (hip abductor muscles), this may irritate your iliotibial band and cause injury. 

Bursitis: This is a build-up of inflammation , caused by friction in the fluid filled sacs between your tendons and bones. Pain may appear during or after a run. For a personalised assessment of your condition, you should see a physiotherapist. Although in the meantime you should ease back on your training and apply ice to the area, following a run. 

 

Foot injuries 

Plantar Fasciitis: The plantar fascia is the thick connective tissue which supports the arch on the bottom of the foot. Plantar fasciitis causes pain in the bottom of the heel.  This is caused by overuse, poor biomechanics, improper running shoes or increasing training intensity too quickly. Your physiotherapist will be able to advise you regarding appropriate treatment, possible orthotic support, or refer you to a podiatrist. 

Stress Fracture: A stress fracture is a crack in the bone caused by repetitive stress or force, often from overuse. A stress-fracture may be difficult to diagnose, even with an X-ray. Stress fractures will require time off from running. At least for six weeks in order to recover. The good news is, once it’s healed, the pain generally won’t return.  It is important to address the cause of the stress fracture, to prevent this injury from occurring again.

The friendly and experienced team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will enable you to improve the mechanics of your body. We will also provide you with a tailored strengthening program and give you running advice which will help you to confidently hit your strides for the Sydney Marathon.

 

Strengthening exercises are key 

A recent study in the American Journal of Sports Medicine found that runners with patellofemoral pain syndrome had significant improvements to their pain and knee function, after they employed an eight week hip and core strengthening program.

Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will be able to pinpoint any issues with your training and help with pain and preventing and treating injuries along the way.

We can provide a range of solutions which may include taping, massage, strengthening exercises and stretching work. Remember that whether you end up coming first or last on the day of the marathon – you’re still a champion and deserve a round of applause! 

If you would like to book an appointment with one of our experienced physiotherapists, please make an online booking or give us a call on 02 9314 3888.

References 

ESSA: Exercise and Sports Science Australia  (2019) Running the Distance

WebMD (2019) Common Running Injuries Prevention and Treatment 

Sports Medicine Australia (2019) Running Fact Sheet University of Wisconsin (2010) A Proximal Strengthening Program Improves Pain, Function, and Biomechanics in Women With Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome. Dr Earl, Jennifer et. al. 

Five Ways to Ease the Pain of Osteorthritis this Winter

Our clients often report that their arthritis plays up more than usual during wintertime. However, you’re not alone in this!  Maroubra Road Physiotherapy have put together some helpful tips to help you manage your arthritis this winter. 

Although physiotherapy can’t cure your arthritis, there are many ways that you can get relief from muscle tension and spasms as your body tries to protect you from chronic pain. So pass over that cup of hot chocolate, snuggle into that blanket and read on! 

Why arthritis flares up during winter 

No, you’re not imagining things, your arthritis actually does get worse during the winter. One US study from 2015 confirmed that cold weather is directly correlated to arthritic pain. The study included 810 participants with osteoarthritis in the knees, hands or hips. There was a correlation found between high humidity, low temperature and increased reports of joint pain.

At present the mechanisms for this increase in arthritis pain aren’t properly understood. Current research suggests that barometric pressure and tissue temperature may be the root cause of weather-related arthritic pain. 

Gentle exercise is key 

The idea of moving your sore joints may seem counterproductive during a bout of arthritis pain, but movement is actually incredibly helpful to you. Joints hate to be stiff and so depending on the severity of your condition, movement may be the best therapeutic treatment for your arthritis. Just be careful to not overdo it. 

 

  • Walking in water 

 

Walking in warm water at chest or waist height is an excellent way to provide your body with both support and resistance training. Start with 10-15 minutes of exercise at first and then build up to longer exercise sessions of over time. Begin slowly and then walk faster as you become more comfortable. 

 

  • Swimming 

 

Likewise, gentle swimming is also good for easing arthritis pain. A hydrotherapy pool is ideal for this and provides a warming, soothing and supportive environment for your sore joints. Just be careful with walking out into the cold straight after your soak. Allow your body time to acclimatise to the changing air temperature afterwards. 

     3. Stationary bike 

If you have access to a stationary bike, then this is a wonderful way to mobilise the knee, and reduce stiffness in the knee joint. It’s also effective for strengthening your quadriceps muscle.

 

  • Tai Chi 

 

Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese exercise which originated as a martial art. It can offer arthritis relief with its slow and gentle stretching movements. One study by researchers at Tufts Medical School found that tai chi was effective in reducing pain and improving functionality for people living with severe knee osteoarthritis. 

Treat yourself with a massage 

In winter the pain of arthritis can make you feel miserable. So you should give yourself full permission to get a massage. A lot of the pain you are experiencing comes from inflammation of the joints and the supportive muscles surrounding them. Research in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine in 2015 demonstrated that having an hour long massage once every eight weeks reduces pain in the muscles and joints. 

Heat as a healer 

Heat is incredibly helpful for soothing pain. If you experience wrist pain, then a pair of arthritis gloves will help to soothe the wrist joint and keep your hands warm. A simple heat pack placed on the affected area of the body can also do wonders for easing aches and pains. Maroubra Road Physio sell heat packs in a variety of shapes and sizes that are designed to comfortably fit areas of the body needing comforting warmth. 

Soft tissue mobilisation 

At Maroubra Road Physiotherapy our physiotherapists are experts at mobilising stiff joints, massaging sore tight muscles with various soft tissue release techniques. We can also teach you strengthening exercises which will support your joints and help with long term pain management and pain relief.

 

How Maroubra Road Physiotherapy can help 

A diagnosis of arthritis often comes with a lot of worry and a feeling of helplessness. But the great news is that you can live with arthritis and effectively manage it with these techniques and tips. 

The friendly and professional team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy can help you to manage your pain by getting you moving safely, rebuilding and restoring affected joints. We will show you how to beat the winter blues by exercising in a way to help manage the symptoms of arthritis. 

We can tailor a stretching and exercise program to your specific needs. This will help you with strength, balance, flexibility and pain management. We can also provide you with advice and tips to improve your posture, and specific therapeutic tools and techniques that will support your body. Most importantly, we listen and are always available to support you to become healthier and happier while living with arthritis. Book an appointment with one of our friendly team today!

If you would like to book an appointment with one of our experienced physiotherapists, please make an online booking or give us a call on 02 9314 3888.

References 

Arthritis Foundation of America (2019) Tai Chi for Arthritis 

Journal of Rheumatology (2015) The Influence of Weather Conditions on Joint Pain in Older People with Osteoarthritis: Results from the European Project on Osteoarthritis.   

The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (2015) Pilot study of massage in veterans with knee osteoarthritisTufts Medical School (2008) Tai Chi and Your Knees

Tips for staying active and healthy this winter

Exercise during winter can sometimes feel like a chore. It may be easier to reach out of your doona and hit the snooze button on your phone, right?

However, the benefits you can gain from hauling your sorry self into regular exercise during winter far outweigh the downsides. Exercise improves muscle mass and decreases body fat. Also, a flood of endorphins elevate your mood and give you a feeling of well-being. This has flow-on effects in how you perform in your workplace, your home life and in daily activities.

Listen to your body

Winter often brings with it an increased vulnerability to a cold or flu. If you are feeling ‘under the weather’ with aches, body pains and a fever, it’s best to visit your GP. Or alternately to cease your regular exercise until you feel better.

How to stay motivated

Although people tend to associate winter with increased weight gain, one US study found otherwise. Research showed that there was only a small correlation between reduced physical activity, colder weather and weight gain. Although that’s no reason to start eating unhealthily or to cease exercise. Keeping the right balance is what will keep you healthy, fit and happy during the short days and long nights.  

 

1. Stay hydrated

The air during winter can be dry, cold and harsh. Although because it’s cold we often won’t feel as thirsty as we would in hot weather. Dehydration can affect the functionality and lubrication of muscles and joints, making you more susceptible to injury. So always remember to keep drinking plenty of water during winter. We recommend approximately eight glasses per day.   

 

2. Workout with friends

It’s easier to get out of bed for a jog or to attend netball when you know you have friends counting on your participation.  

 

3. Plan and prepare

As the old saying goes: ‘failing to plan is planning to fail’. It’s much easier to stay motivated to exercise when you have your running shoes, yoga mat or workout gear ready for you in the morning. Also consider moving your regular outdoor workout to the early evening after work, when the cold isn’t as intense compared to the early morning.

 

4. Set achievable goals

Instead of saying: ‘I want to enter into an Iron Man Competition by summer’. Or, ‘I want to lose 20 kilos by the summer’, keep your goals for exercise realistic, specific and measurable. A better goal could be: ‘I want to take the dog for a 40 minute walk every other day’. Or, ‘I want to take the stairs up to my office every morning’. Then set a recurring calendar item on your phone to remind yourself.

 

5. Choose the right exercise for you

The kind of exercise that’s right for you will be a combination of several factors. It will involve an activity you enjoy, along with an exercise that’s within your current physical capabilities. This is the magical recipe that will keep you interested in the long term. If you absolutely love dancing, but you feel obligated to continue jogging in order to stay fit, then you have it back to front! Make it easier by doing physical activities that you genuinely enjoy.

 

6. Seek professional guidance

The team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will be able to advise you on the best form of exercise to match your current fitness levels, lifestyle, health and physical capabilities.

 

How to warm up properly before exercise

A warm-up is essential before any workout. However it’s even more critical when exercising outdoors in winter.  If you decide to brave the cold, ensure that you give your body extra time to warm up and get your heart and lungs pumping. Warm-ups are vital because they reduce the risk of injury and prepare your body for higher intensity exercise. A warm-up will progress in intensity and should last about ten minutes in duration.

Your warm-up should be specific to each sport and training session because different muscle groups need to be activated. For example a warm up prior to cardio training will be slightly different to a warm-up before a weights session.

 

Warm-up for a cardio session

  • A one kilometer walk.
  • Hip openers, leg swings, A-march, B-march, walking lunges, squats.  
  • Single leg hops, bounding, run throughs.

Warm-up for a weights session

  • For a lower limb focused weights or strengthening session, you should focus on your lower body for your warm up. Include weighted squats and lunges, air squats, glute bridges, skipping and leg swings (forwards and backwards).
  • For a weights or strengthening session that is focused on the upper body, you should warm up these muscles. Start with shoulder presses, rows and bench pressing. Then try out arm swings (forwards and backwards), theraband activation of rotator cuff muscles, and theraband rows.

For more information on warming-up effectively, speak with one of the friendly expert team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy.

How to stay consistent with your training during winter

According to experts from Mississippi State University, you have three ways you can stay warm over the winter. You can either modify your food intake, your activity level or your clothing.

Experts from Exercise and Sports Science Australia take a broad view of what constitutes as exercise. Their tips for successfully maintaining training and exercise regimen during winter are simply summed up in two words – move more!

 

Move more

People who maintain healthy exercise habits during winter are those who are always doing something. They could be walking up six flights of stairs instead of taking the lift. They could be taking the dog for a walk in the evenings. Or having a lunch time walking meeting. If you take every opportunity to move your body during winter, it will reward you with increased flexibility, fitness and strength. The important thing is to keep on moving every day for at least 30 minutes per day.

 

Commit yourself to an exercise class

Another way of staying consistent with your exercise during winter is to commit to a dedicated exercise class. Maroubra Road Physiotherapy have several classes a week that are run by experts in exercise physiology and physiotherapy. These classes will help you to gain or maintain your strength, conditioning and flexibility.

 

Balance and Conditioning classes

This progressive class is especially designed for people with balance issues due to general deconditioning from age or injury. The classes are taught by a physiotherapist who specialises in movement and rehabilitation.

 

When:           Select a time that suits you.

Tuesday 2.30 pm

Friday 11.00 am

Cost:              Check with your health fund if you may be eligible for cover.

$25 per session.

 

New patients. $80 for an initial 30 minute screening to evaluate your current fitness level, goals and any pre-existing medical conditions. This also includes one free trial class.

Who:              Anyone is welcome, however spots are limited. Please register your interest by calling 02 9314 3888.

Where:          Maroubra Road Physiotherapy. Shop 4-5, 16 Maroubra Road, Maroubra, 2035.

Core Strengthening Classes

Whether you are suffering from pain or wanting to prevent injury – this class will engage your core and create body awareness and progressively build strength required for optimal function.

When:           Select a time that suits you.

Tuesday 3.15 pm

Wednesday 6.00 pm  

Friday 11.45 am

Cost:              Check with your health fund if you may be eligible for cover.

$25 per session.

New patients. $80 for an initial 30 minute screening to evaluate your current fitness level, goals and any pre-existing medical conditions. This also includes one free trial class.

Who:              Anyone is welcome, however spots are limited. Please register your interest by calling 02 9314 3888.

Where:          Maroubra Road Physiotherapy. Shop 4-5, 16 Maroubra Road, Maroubra, 2035.

 

Maroubra Road Physiotherapy treat people at all stages of their lives and for all kinds of reasons with our caring, experienced and professional team. Book an appointment today on (02) 9314 3888

 

References

 

The Conversation, (2019) It’s cold! An exercise physiologist explains how to keep your body feeling warm. Dr John Eric Smith. Assistant Professor, Exercise Physiology. Mississippi State University

NHS (2018) A Guide to Exercising During Winter

University of Massachusetts Medical School (2006) Seasonal variation in food intake, physical activity, and body weight in a predominantly overweight population. Y Ma et. al.

Exercise and Sports Science Australia (2018) 15 Exercise Habits You Need

Happy Mother’s Day! Tips for mums to stay pain-free

Happy mother’s day! Tips for mums to stay pain-free

Mother’s Day is coming up and that means a lot of cake, cups of tea in bed and other delights. Hopefully, you can get the morning off on this special day! For all mums, the journey of motherhood can sometimes be daunting. There is a lot of information to consume about how to care for your baby as they turn into a child, a teen and eventually an adult. But what about caring for all of those niggling aches and pains that you experience ? This Mother’s Day, honour and cherish yourself with these helpful hints and tips for avoiding common ‘mum’ pains in the body.

Where is the pain coming from?

Pain can either be localised to a specific area of the body or referred from another part of the body. Pain in the abdominal region or pelvis are quite common in the weeks after childbirth, but also at other times during motherhood.  

Strengthening weakened pelvic floor muscles

The pelvic floor muscles extend like an elastic band or a hammock between your hip bones and spine and encompass ligaments and nerves. Essentially they keep your abdominal organs in place. Giving birth can often weaken pelvic floor muscles. Although women of all ages and stages of life can have a weakened pelvic floor.  This can also be caused by hormonal changes during menopause and gaining weight.

But it’s not all doom and gloom! There are many therapeutic treatments out there to help strengthen your pelvic floor. Common interventions include manual therapy, massage or a therapeutic exercise prescription such as clinical Pilate’s classes. The friendly and highly experienced team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will be able to help you to reduce pain and restore function to body.

What are Kegel Exercises?

Kegel exercises are also known as pelvic floor exercises. They were invented back in the 1940’s by a gynaecologist named Dr Kegel. Women of all ages are encouraged to try Kegel exercises. The exercises are great for recovering from childbirth, as well as for dealing with hormonal changes to the body during menopause.

A Kegel exercise to try

The great thing about Kegel exercises or pelvic floor exercises is that you can do them almost anywhere and nobody will even know!

Exercise: cat cow squeeze

Step 1:

Kneel on your hands and knees on the ground. As you would for a cat-cow position in yoga.

Step 2:

Close your eyes, imagine what muscles you would tighten to stop yourself from passing urine.   

Step 3:

Now that you can feel your pelvic floor muscles working, tighten them and hold for three to five seconds. By doing this, you should feel your pelvic floor muscles ‘lift up’ inside you and feel a definite ‘let go’ as the muscles relax.

If you can hold longer (but no more than a maximum of eight seconds), then do so. Repeat up to ten times or until you feel your pelvic floor muscles fatigue. Rest for a few seconds in between each squeeze.

In order to keep your pelvic girdle strong and to prevent pelvic pain it’s recommended to exercise your pelvic floor regularly. If you do have questions about your pelvic floor muscles, or pelvic pain you should make an appointment to see Maroubra Road Physio’s team of physiotherapists. Our friendly and highly experienced team offer assistance with ante-natal and post-natal physiotherapy.   

Post-partum back pain

Back pain during pregnancy is a common occurrence. Generally though, you should be experiencing less and less pain in the months following delivery, as your body heals itself. If you have persistent back pain, you may need to seek help from a physiotherapist.  

Gentle exercise

When you have gotten the OK from your physiotherapist you can gradually start doing exercises to strengthen your back and abdominal muscles. Walking, gentle stretching and gentle yoga are often recommended. Just be sure to avoid extreme positions or overstretching. Listen closely to your body for any signs of pain or discomfort and stop immediately if you experience this.

Correct body posture post-partum

Adopting the correct body posture while breast-feeding or feeding your baby with a bottle will help with back pain. Ensure that you use plenty of pillows to support your back. Adopt a position where you sit up straight with your back erect and supported to avoid straining your back. Try out different positions when breastfeeding. If you have tense or sore shoulders or upper back, a side-lying position for breastfeeding might be the most comfortable for you.

Remember that when picking up a baby or any other heavy object, you should bend from the knees in a crouching position rather than bend from the waist or hips. The latter method puts a lot of pressure on your spine and leads to pain.  

Sacroiliac and lumbosacral pain

The biological necessity for rapid growth during pregnancy causes a lot of changes to your body as a mum.

These changes include fluid retention, weight gain, changes to your centre of gravity, ligament laxity and overstretching your postural muscles. Sacroiliac and lumbosacral problems are experienced by many women in months after delivery. But if the problems persist for 12-18 months after giving birth then you can try some physiotherapy and self-care solutions to resolve this.

Causes of sacroiliac and lumbosacral pain

The release of a hormone called relaxin during pregnancy causes the ligaments in your pelvis to loosen. This means your body is more easily able to accommodate the growth of the baby. Although it does lead to instability of the pelvic joints, also known as the sacroiliac joints. The weight gain that naturally occurs during pregnancy also places an additional load onto the pelvic joints and lower back making them more susceptible to injury.

Pain is often felt in the buttocks near the tail-bone and lower back. Pain can also radiate to the front of the pelvis, hips and thighs.

One or both legs may feel weak and you may feel less able to bear weight.  When walking, turning in bed, bending forwards to pick up your baby or attempting to breastfeed you may be experiencing pain.

Self-help for sacroiliac pain

Here are some easy at-home tips for preventing sacroiliac pain:

  • Avoid being in positions where your body weight is unevenly distributed between each leg.
  • Change your position in bed by first sitting up right, then turning around.
  • Sit down when you put on your socks or shoes.
  • If walking is particularly painful, try using a pelvic support belt until the pain subsides.
  • Try contracting the muscles in your abdomen prior to exerting yourself through movement.

Physiotherapy treatments for sacroiliac and lumbosacral pain

The team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will employ a range of treatments and provide advice on many ways the pain can be alleviated. You may receive education on movement patterns and positions to avoid.   Often the gentle mobilisation of stiff joints in the hip, back and pelvis, which may be contributing to this pain, may help. Soft tissue release techniques will help to relieve pain in the strained muscles.

Don’t forget to take care of yourself  

Here’s a good excuse to get some alone time in the first few months. A soak in a warm bathtub will really ease muscle aches and pain, improve your mood and energy levels. Remember that it’s Mother’s Day coming up. That means you’re allowed to schedule in some much needed ‘me’ time. From everyone at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy, we hope you have a great Mother’s Day and a great year ahead.

If you enjoyed this article, please share it with a woman you love, whether it’s your own mum, a friend or someone else. And if you would like to know more about overcoming musculoskeletal pain, then give the friendly and professional team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy a call on (02) 9314 3888.

References

Department of Health, Australian Government (2017) Physiotherapy advice after childbirth.

The Conversation (2019) Are Kegel Exercises Actually Good For You? Melissa Kang, University of Technology, Sydney.

Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine (1997) Myofascial pain syndrome and trigger-point management Dr Stephanie Han et. al.

South Australian Government (2018) Pelvic Floor Exercises After Giving Birth

The Royal Women’s Hospital, Melbourne. Pelvic Floor Exercises.

Cochrane Database System Review (2015) “Interventions for preventing and treating low-back and pelvic pain during pregnancy. Liddle S.D., and Pennick V.

BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders (2016) “Predictors and consequences of long-term pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain: a longitudinal follow-up study” Elden H., Gutke A., Kjellby-Wendt G., et al.

Eight helpful ways that older people can boost their fitness and energy levels

The passage of time ensures that inevitably, everyone becomes older. However, the expression ‘age is just a number’ is a positive and empowering way to look at getting older. In this post by Maroubra Road Physiotherapy, we look at eight helpful ways that older people can use exercise.  We will look at ways to stay healthy and fit, along with how to avoid common injuries that older people regularly encounter.

Boost your exercise regime to make your bones stronger

As we age, our bones become more brittle and are easier to break. Exercise and physical activity plays an important role in maintaining bone density and building muscle mass. Doing so also ensures that older people continue to have a high quality of life into their later years.

Muscle wasting (also known as sarcopenia) is also common as we age. Exercise can radically reduce the risk of sarcopenia, bone brittleness and also boost fitness, strength and mobility.  

 

Exercise regularly to protect your brain and body

Studies have shown that exercise, combined with a balanced diet mitigates against the risks of diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, dementia and obesity. Particularly as we age, we do ourselves a favour by maintaining a sustained and regular exercise programme over the years.

 

Try weight-bearing exercises

 

The strength of your bones improves when you regularly place a certain amount of load upon them. This doesn’t need to be a heavy weight or  involve a complicated exercise routine. Weight-bearing exercises could simply mean regular brisk walking, jogging and stair climbing. Other gentle weight-bearing exercises include pilates, yoga and tai chi.

As you gradually build fitness, and in consultation with a physiotherapist or exercise physiologist, you may consider trying a more intense form of weight-bearing exercise, such as dancing, hiking or tennis.

 

Try resistance training

 

Resistance training requires your muscles to contract while you lift weights. This is great for strengthening your bones and muscles. For older people, this kind of resistance training should focus on targeting specific areas that are vulnerable to fractures such as the joints, especially the hips and spine.

Some types of resistance training include lifting light weights to improve your upper and lower body strength.

It’s important to note that the amount of exercise you do, and the degree of difficulty of the exercise will depend on the individual, their health status and any pre-existing sporting injuries. If you have any doubts, speak with the physiotherapists at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy about tailoring an exercise program that best suits you.

 

Avoid falls through balancing exercises

 

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO), a fall is an event where a person comes to rest inadvertently on the ground or floor. As we age, our risk of having a fall increases.  Even though the risk of falling increases with age; balance, strength and conditioning exercises will significantly reduce these risks.

An interesting fact is that 50% of all falls occur in the home. Around one third of all people aged over 65 will have a fall each year. Stretching, strengthening and balancing exercise are a terrific way to manage the health of your bones and muscles and their functional abilities.

Risk factors for falls in the home

It’s not only poor muscle strength and poor balance that contribute to increased risks of falling. Here are some other known risk factors:

  • Cognitive impairment
  • Medication side-effects
  • Poor nutrition
  • Hazards in the home environment
  • Inner ear problems
  • Low blood pressure
  • Poor vision

Despite these additional risk factors, regular exercise that incorporates resistance training, weight training, static and dynamic stretches and balancing exercises can reduce the risk of falls by up to 20%. It’s recommended to incorporate at least 2-3 hours of this kind of exercise each week to gain the most benefit.

Prolonged independence, longevity, increased wellbeing, increased muscle strength and power are some of the benefits that older people can enjoy through exercises targeted at falls prevention. It is important to remember that when doing these exercises, special care is needed to minimise the risks of falling. The team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will be able to provide the personalised care and guidance needed for this kind of exercise. We also offer small group balance and conditioning exercise classes at the practice twice per week, which are tailored to the individuals participating in the class.

Try some balancing exercises

Here are some great balance-strengthening exercises to try :  Please ensure you are safe from falling when doing these exercises.

  • Tai chi
  • Heel-to-toe stances
  • Heel-to-toe walking
  • Sideways walking
  • Backwards walking
  • Seated Knee Extensions
  • Standing Leg Curls
  • Toe Raises
  • Step-ups
  • Standing on one leg (with hand support as needed)
  • Repeated chair stands (getting up and down from a chair)

Know how much exercise is right for you

Sadly, only 25% of older adults in Australia get enough physical activity each day. Only 6% will do strengthening and balancing exercises.  

Getting your body moving is generally a good idea, if you are healthy. This can be achieved through cycling, walking, gardening and home maintenance.

If you are feeling unwell, or your body is in a frail condition, it is important to seek professional help before undertaking an exercise regimen. Maroubra Road Physiotherapy can assess your personal abilities, health condition and how you should approach this exercise regime so that you get the most out of it.

Join a community event and get active

Many older people face barriers to getting active that could be financial, social or practical. Here are some resources and services which offer information, encouragement and organised exercise for older people.

 

At Maroubra Road Physiotherapy, we offer preventative care to help older people with their balance, strength and body conditioning, which helps to prevent falls. We take a holistic approach to the health and well-being of older people, and see the whole person, not just the condition. We have helped many older people to regain their strength and fitness following a musculoskeletal injury.

 

References

The Conversation (2018) Health Check: How much physical activity is enough in older age  

Exercise and Sports Science Australia. (2018) Healthy Ageing: Age Is just a number if you exercise right?

Sports Medicine Australia. Australian Government. (2019) Active Older People

Sports Medicine Australia. Australian Government. (2008)   Choose Health, Be Active: A Physical Activity Guide for Older Australians.

NSW Ministry of Health (2019) Active and Healthy

The Heart Foundation Australia (2019) Walking Groups

The Essential Guide for Surfers on Sydney’s beaches

Did you know that over 2.2 million Australians hit the waves and surf recreationally?  With the spectacular Maroubra Beach right on our doorstep, we thought it was “high tide’’ for a post all about surfing. Here is the essential guide for surfers to avoid injury out on the waves.

The Benefits of Surfing

For your body

It’s possible to burn up to 1,000 calories an hour with surfing.  This makes it an energy-hungry activity and fantastic for losing weight, along with increasing the strength and muscle tone of your entire body. It is  good to remember that the amount of calories you burn will depend on your body weight, workout intensity and metabolism. This varies from person to person.

For your mind

Surfing has a positive impact not just your body, but also on your overall mental health. Studies have found that surfing can be useful and beneficial for treating Anxiety, Depression, PTSD and Bipolar disorders. Another reason to embrace the beauty of Maroubra’s surfing lifestyle.

Preventing the most common surfing injuries

Surfing is considered to be a safe sort, with 2.2 injuries per 1,000 surfing days. And the majority of injuries aren’t serious.

Don’t believe the hype about shark attacks. You are more likely to get a laceration or sprain through surfing, which account for 75% of all surfing injuries. This is followed by dislocations and fractures.

In terms of the area of the injury, 46% of injuries are sustained to the leg, followed by injuries to the head or face (26%), the trunk/back (13%) and the shoulder and arm (13%).

Precautions, warm-ups, understanding the ocean and checking your equipment before you go out, all significantly lower the risk of injury.

Safety tips for surfers

Surfing obviously looks cool. However it’s more complex and tricky than it looks.  There are a number of things that every novice surfer should remember before catching waves.

  • Get the right board: New surfers will benefit from using a longboard (or Malibu board). This board is designed to be easier to balance, stand up and paddle with.
  • Respect other surfers: Don’t cut in on other people’s waves. Many injuries result from collisions between surfers. Respect other swimmers: Remember that surfers aren’t allowed to surf between the flags on patrolled beaches.
  • Look out for other surfers and swimmers: If you see someone else in trouble, alert the life-guards or if it’s safe, assist the individual.
  • Slap on the sunscreen: Always wear sunscreen, even on cloudy days.
  • Do a pre-surf equipment check: Ensure that your board is waxed up and has grip. Ensure that your leg rope is in good condition. Use the leg rope on your surfboard if you are a beginner.
  • Wear a wetsuit and booties: A wet suit and reef booties aren’t just designed for colder weather. Remember that everyone has a different idea of what constitutes cold water. This extra layer can also offer some protection against sharp reef and rock collisions.
  • Know how to swim to (at least) intermediate level: The Australian coast is a fickle and unpredictable beast. So don’t tackle surfing in the ocean without first knowing how to swim. You should be an intermediate to advanced swimmer before you begin surfing, otherwise surfing will pose additional risks for you.

Learn how to read the ocean

Did you know that there are around 17,500 rips that are operating on the Australian coast on any given day? Surfers and swimmers getting caught in rips account for more deaths than other natural hazards, such as bushfires and cyclones in Australia.

Being out on a board in the water can feel very relaxing. However remember that it can also be a dangerous place. As a surfer, whether you’re a novice or a more experienced surfer, you should know how to read the ocean and avoid dangerous spots.

Where there is a rip, you will see:

  • Murky brownish water caused by sand being stirred up from the bottom of the ocean.
  • Darker colours in the ocean (indicating deep water).
  • A smoother ocean surface with much smaller waves, alongside white water.
  • Waves breaking further out to sea on both sides of a rip.
  • Debris, flotsam and jetsam that’s floating out to sea.

Warm-up before you surf

Surfing is one of the most physically demanding sports in the world. It involves a lot of different muscle groups when you paddle out, catch a wave, balance on a surfboard and attempt aerial moves. Therefore it’s important to warm-up to prevent injury or painful muscle cramps once you hit the water.

Your warm-up should consist of exercises that increase the heart rate, release tight muscles and lubricate joints.

Breathing Squat: perform a squat movement, exhaling as the body moves down, and inhaling as the body comes back up, extending the arms towards the sky.

Warrior Lunge: Begin in a basic standing position and lunge forward into a lunge position, extend your arms to the sky, push up off front foot and back into starting position. To advance the movement, you can repeat the prior movement and then add a side bend in either or both directions.

Butt Drops: Reach towards the sky and then bend forward to touch your toes. Drop your butt towards your heels as you lift the chest to face forwards. The elbows are inside of the knees, pushing them outwards. Lower your butt as low as possible and keep your chest as tall as possible. Hold this position for one inhale/exhale and then lift your butt back towards the sky, as your head and chest move back towards ground. Stretch the hamstrings and repeat the movement.

Single Leg Upper Body Rotation: Stand on one leg with the knee slightly bent, and your hip pushed backwards. With your arms placed in front of the body, rotate from side to side slowly. Control the movement and remain balanced on one single leg.

T-Rotation Push-ups: Begin in push-up position, and then rotate one arm towards the sky, while simultaneously rotating the body onto one side. You are now balanced on one hand, with the other hand/arm extended towards the sky. Rotate back into push-up position and repeat on the other side.

Bent Shoulder Circles: Keeping a straight back, with slightly bent knees, bend the torso forward. Get to an angle where you begin to feel a light stretch in your hamstrings and bring the arms out to the sides into a T-position. Perform small arm circles for 30 repetitions in each direction.

About Maroubra Road Physiotherapy

Maroubra Road Physiotherapy treat muscle sprains, joint injuries, back, neck and shoulder injuries. In the past, we have treated many novice and experienced surfers in the local area. Coming in for treatment early on reduces recovery time and also the risk of injury recurrence. If you have a surfing injury, the experienced and friendly team here at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy hope to hear from you.

If you would like to book an appointment with one of our experienced physiotherapists, please make an online booking or give us a call on 02 9314 3888.

 

References

ABC Science (2013) Australian Surf Deadlier than Bushfires

Exercise and Sports Science Australia (2019) Want to be healthier and happier in 2019 – dive in!

Exercise and Sports Science Australia (2018) What exercise burns the most calories?

Sports Medicine Australia (2017) Surfing Fact Sheet

Surfer Today (2018) The Complete Guide to Surf Training

The Victorian Government Better Health Channel (2019) The Health Benefits of Surfing

Six common DIY injuries and how to prevent them

TV shows such as The Block have made millions of Australians passionate about DIY. The appeal is real, because with some skill and determination, you can turn an old house with good bones, into a stunningly beautiful, renovated home. Yet for any DIY quest, it’s important that you understand the risks involved.

Fast Facts About Aussie DIY injuries

  • 30% of all adult injuries in Australia occur in the home and garden.
  • Home injuries result in more time off work than workplace injuries.
  • If the principles of workplace OH&S were applied to home DIY, such as using the correct tools and lifting techniques, it would prevent many home injuries.
  • Young men aged between 20 to 39 years old are the most commonly injured in home DIY accidents.  
  • The most common injuries are lacerations and wounds from foreign bodies and operating machinery, followed by musculoskeletal injuries, such as lower back pain, shoulder and elbow complaints.

Source: Monash University, Accident Research Centre, Department of Human Services and Health (1999) Prevention of Injuries associated with Do-It-Yourself activities.

Prevention is always better than a cure. So here are some simple tips from Maroubra Road Physiotherapy, which may help to prevent some common DIY injuries.

Wear protective gear

We don’t want to dampen your enthusiasm for keeping your home beautiful, however you should wear protective gear when doing DIY at home.  You should wear steel-capped boots, safety glasses, safety gloves and earmuffs when operating power tools.

Many avoidable injuries to the back, feet and hands frequently occur because individuals weren’t wearing protective gear. Despite the Aussie stereotype, thongs are not considered to be safe DIY footwear. If you really must wear rugby shorts when doing DIY, at least make sure they aren’t Queensland maroon!

See the table below for a startling reality check, about why protective gear is always a good idea when using power tools.

Source: DIY injuries fact sheet

A DIY expert always checks his tools and techniques

Doing a preliminary safety check of your tools is an often overlooked part of any DIY job. When getting your tools and equipment such as ladders, saws and grinders out of storage, make sure you check that they are still operating correctly before you use them.

For this reason, it’s always a good idea to keep safety guides for your power tools and equipment. They provide important insights. It’s not commonly known that power tools can cause tennis elbow, more frequently than actually playing tennis! Firmly gripping a power tool over many hours results in pain in the outside of the elbow.

Lift and carry furniture the back-friendly way

Many people visit our clinic because they have incorrectly lifted heavy furniture or other objects, resulting in injury.

There is a correct way to lift heavy items, which will protect your knees and back.

For heavy loads, bend your body to lift from the knees, rather than bending from your lower back.

While lifting the item, keep it close to your body and never bend or twist with any heavy object. For carrying or transporting heavy items like white ware, TVs or sofas, use a wheel-trolley or gurney.  

At Maroubra Road Physiotherapy, when it comes to common back and neck injuries, we see the whole person, rather than just the injury. We create step-by-step programmes that are uniquely tailored to meet individual circumstances and needs.

Be careful on that ladder, daredevil!  

Summer is an amazing time to get outside and clean the gutters, paint the exterior of the home or fix any broken roof tiles. In order to ensure you don’t fall and experience serious multiple traumas or even death, you should stabilise your ladder on even ground.

If you must climb up high on uneven ground, make sure you have a supporting person holding the ladder steady beneath you at all times. Always make sure that the ladder is locked in place before heading up.

Avoid repetitive DIY tasks for long periods

Are you going to paint the house, pave the driveway or retile the family room this summer? Repetitive tasks that require repeated movements over many hours can result in muscle overuse injuries, strains, sprains to the hands, arms, neck, back and shoulders.

Painting the ceiling or walls often leads to shoulder injuries, like a bursitis or an injury to the rotator cuff.

This is because keeping your arm elevated overhead may compromise the position of your shoulder. This can result in a pinching of the soft tissues where the shoulder blade meets the collar bone. A sudden movement during this kind of work could result in an acute tearing of the muscles in the shoulder.

To avoid this, make sure you get up and have a break or do something else every two hours to avoid repetitive strain injuries.

Our friendly and highly experienced team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy treat these kinds of injuries every day. We use a combination of soft tissue release techniques, exercise-based rehabilitation and manual therapy.  This helps to strengthen the muscles and prevent future re-injury.

Avoid staying stationary in one position too long

Gardening involves many hours hunched over the garden bed or hauling heavy bags of potting mix. If you need to remain still for long periods, this can cause a lower back injury.  By doing appropriate pause exercises and maintaining postural awareness, you can avoid common strains and sprains. Doing so will enable you to cope better with the physical demands of DIY.

Good luck on your quest for a renovated home and garden! You can expect a few aches and pains if you’re not used to lots of exercise. However if this persists for more than a week, then you should get a physiotherapy assessment to ensure that you don’t worsen your injury or lengthen your recovery time.

Doing so, also means you are recovering from injury in a personalised way that is safe and beneficial to your health. Speak with the team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy today to book an appointment on (02) 9314 3888.

References

Flinders University, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2017) DIY injuries fact sheet

Monash University, Accident Research Centre, Department of Human Services and Health (1999) Prevention of Injuries associated with Do-It-Yourself activities.

CanStar Blue (2018) Six DIY injuries to watch out for.

DIY at home Government of NSW, Department of Health (2014) Do-It-Yourself Safely.   

Government of Western Australia. Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety (2016) Avoid injuries with DIY work

Valentine’s Day Date Ideas: Sweat Together & Stay Together

Valentine’s Day Date Ideas: Sweat Together & Stay together

Regular exercise is one of the most beneficial things that any couple can do together. It’s a fun and healthy way of bonding, and creating great memories. Working out together also wards off many chronic diseases and disorders, such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, depression, anxiety and obesity.

Loads of research backs up the notion that couples who sweat together, stay together. One study from Indiana University found that married couples who joined a health club together have only a 6.3% drop-out rate, compared to couples who worked out separately. The latter group had a 43% drop-out rate over the course of a year.

Mutual health goals help you to build stronger bonds with your partner. With this in mind, here are some great athletic Valentine’s Day date ideas.  

A hiking adventure

Australia has hundreds of beautiful national parks with well-provisioned walking trails and gorgeous scenery. Walking or hiking trails range from easy to advanced. So this is a good form of exercise that most people of all fitness levels and ages can enjoy.  So grab your compass, decent hiking shoes, a picnic and your significant other and go exploring.

A romantic cycling trip

Australia has over 16,000 mapped cycling routes throughout our vast country. Whether you want to go for a city cycle or take a trip of a lifetime to Ayers Rock or Tasmania, Australia is a cyclist’s paradise and offers a fun Valentine’s Day date option. Don’t forget to bring water, food and plenty of sunscreen. An outback tour by bike is best reserved for experienced cyclists because of the complete isolation of the desert.

An indoor rock climbing challenge

City-dwelling couples with less time for a Valentine’s Day date should consider indoor rock-climbing. It’s not weather dependent and the facilities are all over the place in major cities. Also it’s a great way to improve your cardiovascular fitness and strength, while also requiring input from your partner. While one of you climbs, the other one belays the ropes.

A swimming, sauna and spa visit

Treat yourself to a bit of luxury and pampering together by visiting a day spa or health centre. Enjoy a swim together in the pool followed by a sauna, spa treatment and a massage. It’s guaranteed to make you both feel loved, cherished and relaxed afterwards.

Kayaking along the coast

Australia has over 35,000 kilometres of coastline. With so much beach to choose from, you can easily find a place outside of major cities where you can enjoy a kayak together on a deserted romantic beach.  A double kayak is a great way to improve your cardiovascular strength and upper body strength, while also enjoying the wild beauty of the Australian coast.

Warming up and warming down to prevent injury

The expression ‘No pain, no gain’ is really silly when it comes to exercise! To prevent injury, you should listen for the warning signs in your body. Pain is your body’s way of warning you that something is not right.

Common musculoskeletal injuries such as strains, sprains, joint injuries and back pain can be prevented with warm ups. These stretches should last approximately 10 minutes in duration. Warm ups are important because they:  

  • Slowly boost your heart rate and breathing rate.
  • Increase the blood flow to working muscles.
  • Warm up your muscles and improve their elasticity, preparing your body for exercise.

After your workout, a cool down stretch is also important. This could be static stretches (static holding of positions for 10-30 seconds) or dynamic stretches (moving the body through a full range of motion). Both kinds of cool down stretches help you to maintain your flexibility in your muscles, tendons and joints.

If you have forgotten about warm ups and cool down exercises and sustained an injury, it may be time for you to visit the experienced team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy.

Don’t go from zero to hero

If you or your partner are starting from zero exercise and plan on jumping straight into a very athletic Valentine’s date, you should first consider any pre-existing health conditions or injuries you may have.

The friendly team at Maroubra Road Physiotherapy will be able to provide you with an assessment of your musculoskeletal condition.  We will also be able to provide you with expert advice on what kind of Valentine’s date would be most suitable for the both of you.

If either one of you are experiencing pain, it’s a good idea to book an assessment by Maroubra Road Physiotherapy before your athletic Valentine’s Day date.

References

Psychology Today (2014) The Reasons Why Couples Who Sweat Together Stay Together  

Exercise and Sports Science Australia (2017) Exercise Right: Top 5 Active Date Ideas for Valentine’s Day

Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University (1995). Twelve month adherence of adults who joined a fitness program with a spouse vs without a spouse.

Health Education Research (2008) The role of collective efficacy in exercise adherence: a qualitative study of spousal support and type 2 diabetes management.

PLoS One (2013) Energy Expenditure during Sexual Activity in Young Healthy Couples.